Quince Compote The Easy Way

Do you know the color changing fruit? Quince looks like pears but has such a delectable aroma. Join us as we cook this amazing Fall fruit.

Do you know the color changing fruit? Quince looks like pears but has such a delectable aroma. Join us as we cook this amazing Fall fruit.

Get to Know Quince

Paris (the fella from Troy, not the city or the celebutante) gave Helen of Sparta (later, Helen of Troy) a “golden apple.” Actually, scholars believe this to be a quince. The apple referenced in the Song of Solomon and the Garden of Eden? Those same studious folks believe the mentioned fruit to be quince, and not apple. Hmm…

Quince Compote Recipe | Ruffles and Rain Boots

A bit of caution: do not make your first experience eating raw quince. There is a variety that has been created to be eaten raw, but what is normally available is hard, sour, and you’ll never want another again. If you know how to prepare it, however, you’ll want quince every year!

Fun fact: this fruit turns from colorless to pink, and then to a deep red (see note below). It also smells amazing while it is simmering, so it’s perfect to have on the stove if you have friends over. They’ll think you’re a culinary genius!

How to Choose Quince

No matter the variety, quince should be firm and smell very fruity (also a bit of a floral smell). The skin should be a bright yellow – if you find some that are a bit green, snatch ’em up and ripen them on your counter.

Why take my word for the loveliness of quince; why not just try whipping up a big ‘ol batch? Well, who wants to boatload load of something just to find out they don’t like it? Not me, so I altered my preparation down to just a single fruit! That way, you can either conduct an experiment with the kids or you can just try it to see if you like it!

How to Choose Quince | Ruffles and Rain Boots

Quince Recipe (How to Cook Quince)

Prepare by peeling, cutting, and coring the fruit – just slice into 1/8ths. Don’t mince the quince, people. It will break down to a soft texture but it looks great when it’s presented in slices.

NOTE: This recipe can be doubled or tripled. It can also be made using only equal parts quince and sugar.

  • 1 large quince, peeled, cut, and cored
  • 1.5 cup water
  • 1/8 cup to a 1/4 cup granulated sugar (or date syrup) – we use more
  • 1/8 tsp vanilla (or a portion of a vanilla bean)
  • 1/2 tsp honey
  • lemon juice (optional, see note below)
Parchment Paper Lid for Quince Compote | Ruffles and Rain Boots
Yield: 1 cup

Quince Compote The Easy Way

Quince Compote - Fall Fruit

Do you know the color changing fruit? Quince looks like pears but has such a delectable aroma. Join us as we cook this amazing Fall fruit.

Ingredients

  • 1 large quince, peeled, cut, and cored
  • 1.5 cup water
  • 1/8 cup to a 1/4 cup granulated sugar (or date syrup) - we use more
  • 1/8 tsp vanilla (or a portion of a vanilla bean)
  • 1/2 tsp honey
  • lemon juice (optional, see note below)

Instructions

  1. Bring to a boil, add quince, and loosely cover. You can use a parchment paper 'lid' - cut a piece of parchment to fit the inside of your pot and place it directly on top of the cooking quince mixture.
  2. Simmer 45 minutes to 1 hour for it to be soft and sweet, but there are definitely benefits to cooking longer. The longer you cook quince, the more pink or red it gets!

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

8

Serving Size:

1/8 cup

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 36Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 3mgCarbohydrates: 9gFiber: 0gSugar: 7gProtein: 0g

All nutrition information is estimated. Please calculate your exact brands and ingredients if accuracy is desired.

Did you make this yummy recipe?

Please leave a comment or share a photo and tag me @rufflesandrain

Kids in the Kitchen: A Quince Experiment

Get the kid’s in the kitchen and have some fun with quince. Basically, the heat allows the tannins in the flesh to separate, allowing the color compounds to come out. You could do your own experiment: with lemon juice and without lemon juice and talk about stability! If you have a picky eater, you might want to try this food experiment with your little ones. Not only is color changing fruit pretty cool, quince is so very delicious with only a small amount of effort.

Note: Now, for the bit about lemon juice… I have never added it but Kitchen Chemology notes that in order for quince to turn a deep ruby red, one should add it at the beginning stages of cooking because it increases the acidity. Increased acidity allows the color compounds (which have been broken apart by heating the tannins) to stabilize. If you’re making a holiday dinner that could use a deep red accent, it would be so much fun to make it very dark.

How to Serve Quince

Oatmeal: Because this is a fruit readily available in winter, this makes a great addition to morning breakfasts on chilly mornings. We serve it on freshly prepared oatmeal and it goes fast! If you’re into grits, quince definitely sweetens them up nicely, too.

Oatmeal with Quince Recipe | Ruffles and Rain Boots

Applesauce: Another way we love, love, love our cooked quince is to include it in some homemade applesauce. It has really brightened the flavor without overpowering any other ingredient.

Dessert: Warmed quince over vanilla ice cream is a not only amazing but makes for a beautiful presentation. If you’re having people over, wow them with quince! The simple sweet of the vanilla, combined with the rich quince, is one of my favorite desserts. Ever!

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Make Fall's color changing fruit - this quince recipe is a perfect fall treat and is great served on so many dishes. #quince #howtomakequince #quincerecipes #fallfruit #fallrecipes #thanksgiving #fallbreakfast #quincefruit #rufflesandrainboots

8 Comments

  1. Ohh those look so yummy! I heard you talking about quince on your periscope and they look even better than I imagined! I’m going to try to find some, but I haven’t yet! Thanks for sharing on the Welcome Home Wednesday Link party! We really hope to see you again tomorrow at 7 CST!

    1. I’ll definitely be there, Brittany. Keep your eye out for those quince because it’s definitely worth the wait til they are in stores.

  2. I have never tried quince, but I’m quite intrigued.
    Pinned this and I’m on the lookout for quince. Thanks for sharing!
    XOXO

    1. Thanks so much for pinning, Dean – it’s definitely one of my daughter’s favorite things to do in the kitchen. She’s managed to tell all her little friends about the fruit that changes color! :)

  3. I’ve never had quince. Ever!

    You have my curiosity… I may just have to try this out!

    Thanks for sharing. Pinned!

    Wishing you a lovely day.
    xoxo

    1. Just this past Tuesday I was at the grocery store looking for quince (like I said you sparked my curiosity). I couldn’t find it though.

      Thanks for sharing and linking up to the #SHINEbloghop.

      Wishing you a lovely day.
      xoxo

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