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Use This Free Gnome Knitting Pattern to Make a Christmas Gnome

This free gnome knitting pattern is so simple, but makes the cutest knitted gnomes. I love everything gnome, but when I realized I could use this free knitting pattern for gnomes, it’s been all bets off.

How to Knit a Christmas Gnome on a snowy landscape
Use this free knitting pattern for gnomes to learn how to make a knitted gnome with a free gnome knitting pattern.

Gnome Knitting Pattern

Here at Ruffles and Rain Boots, we have been enjoying the nice weather lately. Particularly the slow and easy evenings on the back porch where I can watch the kids and get some knitting in while they play. My latest WIP is this gnome knitting pattern.

RELATED READING: THE BEST CHRISTMAS GNOMES

I love the easy-to-follow instructions and the way that I don’t get easily confused when I, inevitably, get distracted by the kids. If I had to pick a favorite knitting pattern, I would definitely pick this knitting pattern for gnomes. If you’re ready to get your stitch fix with some knitted gnomes, let’s get started.

DIY Christmas Gnome Tutorials

If you’re looking for the best DIY Christmas gnome tutorials, you have come to the right place. Check out all of my favorite tomte tutorials for the holidays!

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collage of diy gnomes teaching how to make a gnome with or without legs and with or without sewing

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You’re busy, I get it. Pin this to your favorite knitted gnomes board on Pinterest and it’ll be here for when you’re ready.

photo collage of Free Gnome Knitting Pattern for Christmas Gnomes with text which reads free pattern for bearded gnomes

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Tips to use this knitting pattern for gnomes

  • As with all knitting, it’s best if you use a stitch marker, especially if you’re going to be distracted at times, from the knitting pattern for gnomes. If you don’t have something, you can always just use twisty-ties or a piece of string. Personally, though, I love these little ball of yarn stitch markers…they’re so cute I almost want to knit just so I can use them. But I really like knitting, so maybe that’s it?
  • Skills you’re going to need:
  • The small gnome finished height is approximately 7” tall, and the larger version is approximately 9” tall.
  • Gauge: In stockinette stitch, 5 stitches x 6 rows = 1″
  • For free-standing gnomes, please add weight to the base before stuffing with Poly-fill. I use Poly-beads (1/2 cup for the small, 3/4 cup for the large) tied up inside a piece of fabric. Note: I have included links to the products I use below.
Free Gnome Knitting Pattern in the snow in front of a tree

How Do I Make a gnome with this Gnome Knitting Pattern?

I’m so glad you asked. Below is our written tutorial. 

Yield: 2

Gnome Knitting Pattern

Free Gnome Knitting Pattern in the snow in front of a tree

This free gnome knitting pattern is so simple, but makes the cutest knitted gnomes. I love everything gnome, but when I realized I could use this free knitting pattern for gnomes, it's been all bets off.

Prep Time 5 minutes
Active Time 1 hour
Additional Time 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Estimated Cost $5

Materials

Tools

  • KFB = Knit front and back – this is a very easy and tidy increase, where you turn one stitch into two.  Knit the next stitch on the left-hand needle, without slipping off the old stitch.  Proceed to knit into the back of that same stitch, and complete the stitch as usual, slipping off the old stitch when complete.  (KFB)
  • K2tog = Knit two together – a very simple decrease, where you turn two stitches into one.  Insert your right-hand needle into the next two stitches on your left-hand needle, and knit them both together. (K2tog)
  • Stockinette Stitch = Alternating a knit row with a purl row – Many patterns call for stockinette stitch and this simply means that you alternate between knit rows and purl rows. For example, row 1: knit, row 2: purl, row 3: knit, row 4: purl, and so on. (Stockinette Stitch)
  • Garter Stitch = Knitting every row – Many patterns call for garter stitch and this simply means that you knit every row. For example, row 1: knit, row 2: knit, row 3: knit, row 4: knit, and so on. (Garter Stitch)
  • When two numbers are given, the number in parentheses applies to the larger size. Where there are increases and / or decreases in the row, the number of total stitches that you should have at that point are in parentheses at the end of the row. The nose is made with a bauble stitch.

Instructions

  1. To make the body: Cast on 4

  2. Row 1: knit

  3. Row 2: kfb of each stitch (8 sts)

  4. Row 3: purl (and every other odd number row)

  5. Row 4:*k1, kfb; repeat from * across (12 sts)

  6. Row 6:*k2, kfb; repeat from * across (16 sts)

  7. Row 8:*k3, kfb; repeat from * across (20 sts)
  8. Row 10:*k4, kfb; repeat from * across (24 sts)

  9. Row 12:*k5, kfb; repeat from * across (28sts)

  10. Row 14:*k6, kfb; repeat from * across (32 sts)
  11. Row 16:*k7, kfb; repeat from * across (36 sts)

  12. Row 18:*k8, kfb; repeat from * across (40 sts)

  13. Row 20:*k9, kfb; repeat from * across (44 sts)

  14. Row 22:*k10, kfb; repeat from * across stitch (48 sts)
  15. Row 23: purl
  16. For Larger Version Go To **
  17. Work 8 rows even in stockinette stitch (knit one row, purl one row)
  18. Row 32: *Knit 10, k2tog; repeat from * across (44 sts)

  19. Row 33: purl
  20. Row 34: *Knit 9, k2tog; repeat from * across (40 sts)
  21. Row 35: purl
  22. Row 36: *Knit 8, k2tog; repeat from * across (36 sts)
  23. Row 37: purl

  24. Row 38: *Knit 7, k2tog; repeat from * across (32 sts)
  25. Row 39: purl
  26. Row 40: *Knit 6, k2tog; repeat from * across (28 sts)
  27. Row 41: purl

  28. Row 42: *Knit 5, k2tog; repeat from * across (24 sts)
  29. Row 43: purl

  30. Row 44: k2tog across (12 sts)
  31. Row 45: purl

  32. Row 46: k2tog across (6 sts)

  33. Row 47: purl
  34. Row 48: k2tog across (3 sts) how to knit and join the seams of a gnome knitting pattern
  35. ** For Larger Version
  36. Row 24:*k11, kfb; repeat from * across stitch (52 sts)
  37. Row 25: purl
  38. Row 26:*k12, kfb; repeat from * across stitch (56 sts) 

  39. Row 27: purl

  40. Work 10 rows even in stockinette stitch (knit one row, purl one row) 

  41. Row 38: *Knit 12, k2tog; repeat from * across (52 sts)

  42. Row 39: purl

  43. Row 40: *Knit 11, k2tog; repeat from * across (48 sts)

  44. Row 41: purl

  45. Row 42: *Knit 10, k2tog; repeat from * across (44 sts)

  46. Row 43: purl

  47. Row 44: *Knit 9, k2tog; repeat from * across (40 sts)

  48. Row 45: purl

  49. Row 46: *Knit 8, k2tog; repeat from * across (36 sts)

  50. Row 47: purl

  51. Row 48: *Knit 7, k2tog; repeat from * across (32 sts)

  52. Row 49: purl

  53. Row 50: k2tog across (16 sts)

  54. Row 51: purl

  55. Row 52: k2tog across (8 sts)

  56. Row 53: purl

  57. Row 54: k2tog across (4 sts)
  58. For both sizes: Cut yarn leaving a long end, thread darning needle,  pull threaded needle back through the three stitches on the knitting needle, removing them from the knitting needle, pull tight to cinch, and sew up seam with right sides facing, leaving a one inch gap on top.  Turn right side out, fill with weight and stuffing and finish the seam. Secure and weave in end. how to stuff a knitted gnome body
  59. To make the beard: Cast on 3 sts

  60. Knit 1 row

  61. Row 2: k1, kfb, knit across  (4 sts)
  62. Row 3: k1, kfb, knit across  (5 sts)

  63. Row 4: knit
Row 5: knit

  64. Row 6: k1, kfb, knit across  (6 sts)
  65. Row 7: k1, kfb, knit across  (7 sts)

  66. Row 8: knit

  67. Row 9: knit
Row 10: k1, kfb, knit across  (8 sts)

  68. Row 11: k1, kfb, knit across  (9 sts)

  69. Row 12: knit

  70. Row 13: knit

  71. Row 14: k1, kfb, knit across  (10 sts)
  72. Row 15: k1, kfb, knit across  (11 sts)

  73. Row 16: knit
Row 17: Knit

  74. Row 18: k1, kfb, knit across  (12 sts)

  75. Row 19: k1, kfb, knit across  (13 sts)

  76. Row 20: Knit

  77. Row 21: Knit

  78. Row 22: k1, kfb, knit across  (14 sts)

  79. Row 23: k1, kfb, knit across  (15 sts)

  80. Row 24: Knit

  81. Row 25: Knit

  82. Row 26: k1, kfb, knit across  (16 sts)
  83. Row 27: k1, kfb, knit across  (17 sts)

  84. Row 28: Knit
  85. Row 29: Knit
  86. Row 30: k1, kfb, knit across  (18 sts)
  87. Row 31: k1, kfb, knit across  (19 sts)

  88. Row 32: Knit

  89. Row 33: Knit

  90. Row 34: k1, kfb, knit across  (20 sts)

  91. Row 35: k1, kfb, knit across  (21 sts)
  92. Row 36: Knit

  93. Row 37: Knit
  94. ** For Larger Version
  95. Row 38: k1, kfb, knit across  (22 sts)

  96. Row 39: k1, kfb, knit across  (23 sts)

  97. Row 40: Knit

  98. Row 41: Knit

  99. Row 42: k1, kfb, knit across  (24 sts)

  100. Row 43: k1, kfb, knit across  (25 sts)

  101. Row 44: Knit

  102. Row 45: Knit
  103. For Both Sizes: Bind Off
. Cut yarn leaving approx. 8 " tail. 
Secure last stitch. 
Attach Beard to gnome so that the point of the beard is *almost* to the bottom 

Hat
. how to attach a gnome beard to body for a knitted gnome
  104. Cast on 40 sts

  105. To make the hat brim: 
Work in garter stitch for 8 (10) rows. 

  106. Rise: 
Row 1: *knit 8, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (36 sts)

  107. Row 2: purl

  108. Row 3: *knit 7, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (32 sts)

  109. Row 4: purl

  110. Row 5: *knit 6, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (28 sts)
Row 6: purl

  111. Row 7: *knit 5, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (24 sts)

  112. Row 8: purl

  113. Row 9: *knit 4, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (20 sts)

  114. Row 10: purl

  115. Row 11: *knit 3, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (16 sts)

  116. Row 12: purl

  117. Row 13: *knit 2, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (12 sts)

  118. Row 14: purl
Row 15: *knit 1, k2tog; repeat from * to end of row (8 sts)
  119. Row 16: purl

  120. Work 4 (6) rows in stockinette stitch (starting with a knit row, and alternating with purl rows) 

  121. Crown: 
Row 1:k2tog( 4 sts)

  122. Row 2: purl

  123. Work 4 (6) rows in stockinette stitch (starting with a knit row, and alternating with purl rows) 

  124. Next row: k2tog( 2 sts) 

  125. Next row 2: purl

  126. Next row K2tog.
  127. For Both Sizes: You now have 1 stitch remaining on the needle. 
Cut yarn, leaving approx. 8 inch tail and secure the last stitch.
Thread darning needle, and sew the hat seam , with right sides facing. 
Turn right side out and place on the gnome.  Stitch in a few places to keep it secure.

 how to knit a gnome hat and attach it to a knitted gnome
  128. To make the nose
: Cast on 1 stitch.

  129. Row 1: Kfb, Kfb and k into the front again of the same stitch (5 sts)

  130. Row 2: Purl across

  131. Row 3: Bind off cut yarn about 5 inches, and secure last stitch.
 This will not look like much of a nose when you bind off. However, it will look super cute once you attach it. Just use the cast on and bind off ends to secure the nose to the beard. Place each end around one stitch and pull tight, and secure. Weave in and trim any loose ends. 
 how to attach a knitted gnome nose

Notes

Note: For more fun gnome tutorials, visit RufflesandRainBoots.com

Did you make this?

Please leave a comment or share a photo and tag me @rufflesandrain

more Knitted Gnomes you might like

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  • Adorable Gnome Hat Knitting Pattern – If you’re into gnomes as more than just decor, but also a little whimsical wearable, well, this gnome knitting pattern is perfect for you! The hat I made fits so well and I just couldn’t be happier.
  • Tomte Teapot Cozy Gnome Knitting Pattern – I had a naked teapot. Now it’s a gnome. Seriously, I love this knitted gnome teapot cozy pattern. So fun.

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  • 75 Holiday Gnome Tutorials – Tired of searching for the perfect gnome tutorial? I’ve got you. I scoured the internet and found best–and pulled them all together just for you!
  • My Most Popular Christmas Gnome Ornaments – Of all the gnomes I’ve ever made, these gnome ornaments are easily my most popular–and easiest. Coincidence? I don’t know…
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Jeanne Traaseth

Saturday 5th of December 2020

I love, love, love this gnome pattern! However, I'm having a hard time keeping them upright. Do you have a trick to prevent them from falling over? Is there some kind of weight I could add to the stuffing? Thanks for a great pattern!

Sarah Nenni-Daher

Tuesday 8th of December 2020

Yes, I add poly beads to the base for free-standing gnomes. Depending on how tight your weave, you might need to put them into a tied-off piece of fabric. Usually, a 1/2 cup works for the smaller one and 3/4 for the large. I thought I had that in the notes, but I'll go check now.

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