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DIY Decongestant Bath Bombs – Get Natural Relief

This easy decongestant bath bombs recipe provides sinus relief, naturally. And because it uses simple ingredients, you’ll have them in no time.

decongestant bath bombs colored with mica powder

Decongestant Bath Bombs Recipe

Here at Ruffles and Rain Boots, we love to share our no-fail bath bomb recipes for beginners and beyond. I have sensitive skin and cannot use the ones you find at the mall, so years ago I started making my own and have perfected the process.

In the winter, my daughter will bring home colds from the kids at school, sharing the love with our family. These natural decongestant bath bombs and shower fizzies help us to manage our symptoms naturally.

RELATED READING: Bath Bombs and Shower Fizzy Recipes for Beginners

pink and blue bath bombs with decongestant recipe with text which reads winter cold relief bath bombs recipe

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Supplies for Sinus Relief Bath Bombs

You don’t have to use this exact recipe for the oil mix – the oils used each have benefits, however, not everyone is a fan of tea tree or thyme. If you substitute, be sure to leave in the eucalyptus. Combine it with just the wintergreen or even peppermint and you’ll receive the same sinus relief benefits.

NOTE: You do not have to use mica powder, soap colorant works just as well. If you use mica, however, add the poly-80 (comes in this mica powder kit) to disperse the color and oil. As an Amazon Associate, I could earn from qualifying purchases.

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup citric acid
  • 1/4 cup cream of tartar
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons rubbing alcohol
  • 5-10 drops of 2-4 oils (I prefer eucalyptus and wintergreen, but also will add tea tree and thyme)
  • teal and pink mica powder (optional) + 10 drops of polysorbate-80 (optional)
  • spray bottle of rubbing alcohol or witch hazel
  • bath bomb molds (our favorites)

Decongestant Bath Bombs

How to Make Decongestant Bath and Shower Fizzies

It’s time to grab your bowls and get started. If you keeping a YouTube playlist of bath bomb recipes, here is our decongestant bath bomb video tutorial.

Yield: 5-9 bath bombs

Decongestant Bath Bombs

Decongestant Bath Bombs

Learn how to make this easy decongestant bath bomb recipe to breathe during winter cold season.

Active Time 20 minutes
Drying 1 day
Total Time 1 day 20 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Estimated Cost $5

Materials

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup citric acid
  • 1/4 cup cream of tartar
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons rubbing alcohol
  • 5-10 drops of 2-4 oils (I prefer eucalyptus and wintergreen, but also will add tea tree and thyme)
  • teal and pink mica powder (optional) + 10 drops of polysorbate-80 (optional)
  • spray bottle of rubbing alcohol or witch hazel
  • bath bomb molds (our favorites)

Instructions

  1. In a bowl, mix baking soda, cornstarch, citric acid, and cream of tartar. 
  2. Add coconut oil to the dry mix, then essential oils. If using, add 10 drops of poly-80.
  3. Split the mix (if you are making more than one color) and add in mica powder.
  4. Add rubbing alcohol to the mix one tablespoon at a time until the mixture holds together in your hand. 
  5. Overfill one mold side, then the other. Press down and slightly twist to ensure the bath bomb forms. Lightly tap the top and remove the bath bomb from the mold. Allow to dry overnight.
  6. how to make decongestant bath bombs for cold and sinus relief

Notes

Tip 1: if the mix begins to dry out as you are molding it, give it a spray with the rubbing alcohol or witch hazel.

Tip 2: If you don’t want a flat portion on your bath bomb, drape a dish towel over a muffin tin and suspend the bath bombs over each cavity. You can turn them to dry the other side fully. 

Did you make this?

Please leave a comment or share a photo and tag me @rufflesandrain


decongestant bath bomb recipe with text which reads the Best Winter Sick Day Bath Bomb

How to Make Decongestant Sinus Relief Shower Bombs 

Not everyone likes taking a bath and some of us are often in the shower because we’re short on time. Don’t worry if you fall into either of those camps, we can easily turn these into a sinus relief shower bomb recipe.

Here at Ruffles and Rain Boots, I’ve shared the differences between bath bombs and shower bombs, but here’s the bare minimum you need to know: for safety reasons, please make shower bombs flat on one side. There are so many fun silicone molds on Amazon this shouldn’t be a problem for anyone.

Additionally, you could fill and press only half of a bath bomb mold and use that. Either way, please make sure there is a flat surface for your shower fizzy to stay in place.

RELATED READING: Mermaid Bath Bombs – You HAVE to See These! 

close up of an easy decongestant bath bombs and shower fizzies recipe

How Long Do Bath Bombs Last?

Because I get asked this question in a lot of comments, I thought I would include here for those of you new to making bath products. How long do bath bombs last?

Generally, bath bombs last about 6 months without any deterioration of fizz, scent, or loss of moisturizing effect. We have a lot of recipes we cycle through and don’t notice any loss even up to 9 months.

What will happen if they are used beyond that time? As far as health concerns, nothing. What will happen is that the citric acid loses its fizzing power over time and the scents will deteriorate.

sinus relief bath bombs as a decongestant bath bomb or shower fizzies

How to Store and Use Decongestant Bath Bombs 

All DIY bath and shower fizzies should be stored in an airtight container and these decongestant bath bombs are no exception. We like to use apothecary jars (sealed hermetic jars), but you can also store them in zip top or top seal plastic bags.

To use a bath bomb, fill a tub with very warm water. Drop one into the water and enjoy the fizzing bubbles, aromatherapy experience, and moisturizing effects. If you’ve turned this recipe into a decongestant shower fizzy, place it just outside the direct stream of water and enjoy.

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collage of bath bomb tutorials, shower fizzy tutorials, and sugar scrub tutorials in teal pink yellow

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photo collage of how to make a cold relief bath bomb with text which reads decongestant bath bombs

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